Date of Award

3-2020

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Health and Human Performance

Program

Exercise Science

First Advisor/Chairperson

Randall L. Jensen

Abstract

This study describes the results of a survey of the strength and conditioning practices of the National Football League’s (NFL) strength and conditioning (S&C) coaches. The primary purpose was to identify the common and unique aspects of the NFL S&C practices during 2018. A secondary purpose was to compare those results to 1997-1998 (‘97-98) to determine differences across years. The survey response rate was 28.1% (9 of 32 NFL teams) agreeing to participate. The survey instrument was a 150 item assessment divided into 10 sections examining the entire training program. Results revealed that subjects test 6.8 ± 3.1 fitness variables using 9.0 ± 3.7 tests; compared to 7.0 fitness variables using 10.0 tests in ‘97-98. Six subjects prescribe plyometric exercises to “all players” 1.8 ± .4 days per week. During the in-season subjects prescribed resistance training 2.3 ± .8 days per week (n=6); similar to 2.8 ± 0.8 days per week in ’97-98 (p= .220). Subjects prescribed off-season resistance training 3.5 ± 0.8 days per week; compared to 2.0 ± 2.9 days per week in ’97-98 (p= .007). Five subjects prescribed “all players” balance and stability training “year round”; on average 3.3 ± .9 days per week (n=4). This data should be useful for future research as a source for comparison. With this new source of information, researchers are able to continue to empirically investigate various aspects of training programing. Additionally, a variety of other S&C practices were examined. This research was funded by two Excellence in Education Research Grants.

Access Type

Open Access

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